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Fine art black and white prints

 

As a fine art photographer I develop my own film and print archival fine art silver gelatin prints from negatives in a traditional wet darkroom.

 

 

Print prices and sizes

 

I generally print in two sizes, from 120 roll film 2¼" square negatives. All prints are dry mounted on museum board ready for matting and framing. Each print is signed and titled on the reverse of the mount.

 

9" x 9" image mounted on 16" x 20" board, £195          

15" x 15" image mounted on 20" x 24" board, £395

 

Other sizes and prices can be discussed 

 

 

Guidance for owners of a Martin Reekie fine art print 
 

You are the owner of a genuine silver gelatin fine art photographic print. Collectors of photographic images much prefer to own silver gelatin prints that have a proven provenance. Prints made from silver gelatin papers over 100 years ago are still in good condition today thanks to the unique qualities of silver based images.


The print you own was created using ILFORD or ADOX silver gelatin photographic emulsion that has been coated on a fine art paper base.


Prints made following an optimum permanence processing sequence will be expected to have an extremely long life if properly stored and handled, and in the event you wish to sell the print it will be recognised as such by other collectors.

 

Proper storage conditions are the most effective method of ensuring the long-term preservation of gelatin silver prints. But what qualifies as proper storage conditions? In the most general terms, proper storage means cool and moderately dry conditions and appropriate storage materials.

 

Since nearly every form of deterioration is dependent on heat and moisture, it is important to keep your photographs out of the loft or other rooms with extremes in temperature and relative humidity. Room temperature is acceptable, but cool or cold is preferred when it is practical, and when humidity can be controlled under those conditions.